Census Response Update

Census Response Update

If you have cabin fever and want to do something that could really make a difference in your community during the stay-at-home directives, consider completing your 2020 Census.

If you have cabin fever and want to do something that could really make a difference in your community during the stay-at-home directives, consider completing your 2020 Census.  As recently described here in Waypoint, this is important as it directs federal funding for many sorts of projects.  Of particular interest right now, critical Federal resources and supplies are allocated to local governments based on the most recent Census results.  Thus, things like the number of ventilators or hospital beds supplemented by Federal resources will be distributed based on the 2010 Census results.  Getting our fair-share of any such resources if needed in the future is just one more reason to complete the Census.

Easton residents are doing a great job so far.  The Town’s response rate as of May 4, 2020 was 63.6%, which exceeds the rate of the nation as a whole (56.8%), the State of Maryland (60.6%), and Talbot County (56.2%).  It also places Easton 37th among all of Maryland’s 157 municipalities and notably, 1st among all Eastern Shore municipalities.  Response deadlines have been extended, so there is still time to do even better.

Many people have concerns of one sort or another about the Census.  To address some of these concerns, the Maryland Department of Planning recently issued the following concerning common myths about the Census:

Myth #1: There’s a citizenship question.

False. There is no citizenship question on the Census. And, you do not need to be a citizen to be counted. The goal of the Census is to count every person living in the US.

Myth #2: My answers will be shared.

Incorrect. The law requires the Census Bureau to keep information confidential. The Census Bureau is only allowed to produce summary data that provides an overview of the population, but nothing representing specific individuals.

Myth #3: My answers could be used against me.

Never. The law prohibits the Census Bureau from sharing information with law enforcement or immigration enforcement agencies under Title 13. Your answers cannot be used to impact your eligibility for government benefits either.

Myth #4: The Census is like a survey – optional.

Wrong – it’s the law. Counting every person living in the United States is done every ten years following Article 1, Section 2 in the Constitution. Participating in the Census is how we get a true picture of America and we need everyone to respond.